Post Script: The Burden of Lies – Richard Beasley

The Burden of Lies

The Burden of Lies

A Peter Tanner Thriller

Richard Beasley

Simon & Schuster Australia

ISBN: 9781925368154

 

Description:

Cocaine. Construction. Corruption.

The unholy trinity of Sydney.

 

Self-made property mogul Tina Leonard has already lost her business, her home and custody of her children because South East Banking Corporation left her bankrupt. Now it appears she is being framed for the murder of her banker Oliver Randall, a senior executive of the corporation. Her motive? Revenge for ruining her life and her business.

 

When maverick lawyer Peter Tanner is brought in to represent Tina, he bends the law to learn the truth. Was the real killer employed by the bank to silence Randall, who knew too much about their corrupt clientele and business dealings?

 

As Tanner digs deeper the truth is harder and harder to find. Drug dealers and dodgy cops are a breed apart from corrupt corporate bankers, who’ll do anything to keep their names in the clear.

 

Who really silenced Randall? Tanner gets more than he bargained for as he tangles with craven bent banks and a client who can’t talk, and danger lurks far too close to home.

 

Bestseller Richard Beasley’s latest sharp-edged, gritty Peter Tanner thriller.

 

My View:

An outstanding read!

On my copy (and advanced readers issue) of this novel the cover has a stamp that says “If you love Michael Connelly you’ll love Richard Beasley” and as many of you have realised I am a big fan of Michael Connelly – how true this  declaration turned out to be! Like Connelly, Beasley characterisations are the strong foundation the narrative is built on. As with Bosch, you will fall in love with Peter Tanner; his wit, humour, sarcasm, self-doubts, his, at times outrageous (but truthful) courtroom frustrations and unfiltered comments…brilliant. Bosch and Tanner – both dedicated, passionate about their vocations, both mavericks who play by their own rules.

 

Loved every minute of this complex, twisty yet credible plot, loved the courtroom drama, loved the characters, and loved Peter Tanner!

I predict we will see this on the small screen sometime soon. My only conundrum – trying to work out who I think would make a great on screen Peter Tanner. Any suggestions?

 

 

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Broad Bean & Pea Salad with Freekeh & Yoghurt Sauce: Cornersmith Salads & Pickles Vegatables with More Taste and Less Waste – Alex Elliott- Howery & Sabine Spindler

CrnrSmthSaladsPicklesImages and recipes from Cornersmith Salads and Pickles by Alex Elliott-Howery and Sabine Spindler (Murdoch Books, RRP $39.99) Photography by Alan Benson.

 

Broad bean & pea salad with freekeh & yoghurt sauce

 

Broad bean

PREPARATION TIME

25 minutes, plus overnight soaking

COOKING TIME

25 minutes

SERVES

4

 

160 g (5½ oz/¾ cup) freekeh, soaked overnight

125 g (4½ oz) podded fresh peas

350 g (12 oz) podded fresh broad beans

60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) olive oil, plus extra for drizzling over
the salad

1 large brown onion, thinly sliced

1½ tablespoons chopped dill, including the stems

juice of ½–1 lemon, to taste

⅓ cup picked dill and mint leaves, torn just before serving

ground sumac, for sprinkling (optional)

 

yoghurt sauce

200 g (7 oz/¾ cup) natural unsweetened yoghurt

2 garlic cloves, crushed

pinch of salt

pinch of chilli powder or  cayenne pepper

 

When it’s broad bean and pea season, you should eat them every day! This salad stars freekeh, a delicious, highly nutritious grain made from roasted green (early harvest) wheat. If you can’t obtain it, use barley, spelt or other grains instead.

This salad looks great on a large flat platter. You could also double the quantity and take it to a barbecue or picnic.” p.12

 

Bring a saucepan of salted water to the boil. Drain and rinse the freekeh, add it to the pan and cook for
6–8 minutes, or until the grains are just tender, but still retain their shape. Drain and set aside to cool.

Meanwhile, bring another saucepan of water to the boil. Blanch the peas for 1 minute, then remove
with a slotted spoon. Refresh them under cold water, drain well and set aside.

Bring the water back to the boil and blanch the broad beans for about 2 minutes. Drain, then refresh under cold water. When cool enough to handle, peel off and discard the outer skin. Set the broad beans
aside, keeping them separate to the peas.

Combine the yoghurt sauce ingredients in a bowl, mixing until smooth. Set aside.

Pour the olive oil into a frying pan large enough to hold the broad beans in one flat layer. Heat over medium–high heat. Add the onion, season with salt and pepper, then let it soften over medium–low heat
for 5–10 minutes, stirring now and then.

Turn the heat back up to high. Add the broad beans and stir-fry for 2–4 minutes, or until they turn golden brown. Add the chopped dill and turn off the heat.

In a mixing bowl, combine the fried broad beans and peas. Season with salt, pepper and lemon juice to taste.

To serve, spread the cooked freekeh on a platter, arrange the broad beans and peas on top and drizzle
with the yoghurt sauce. Finish with the torn dill and mint, a sprinkling of sumac, if desired, and an extra drizzle of olive oil.

Chilli Sambal: Cornersmith Salads & Pickles Vegatables with More Taste and Less Waste – Alex Elliott- Howery & Sabine Spindler

CrnrSmthSaladsPickles

Images and recipes from Cornersmith Salads and Pickles by Alex Elliott-Howery and Sabine Spindler (Murdoch Books, RRP $39.99) Photography by Alan Benson.

 

Chilli sambal

 

PREPARATION TIME

20 minutes, plus 20 minutes sterilising, plus 10 minutes heat-processing (optional)

STORAGE

3 months,
or up to 2 years
if heat-processed

MAKES

4–5 x 375 ml  (13 fl oz/11/2 cup) jars

 

750 g (1 lb 10 oz) long mild red chillies

250 g (9 oz) carrot

50 g (1¾ oz) knob of fresh ginger

4 garlic cloves

55 g (2 oz/¼ cup) sugar

1 tablespoon salt

185 ml (6 fl oz/3/4 cup) white wine vinegar

 

We make mountains of this sambal when chilli season is in full swing. It’s a staple at Cornersmith, and in all our fridges at home. So quick and easy to make, it gives tacos, rice dishes, marinades and breakfast eggs a good hit of heat.

We use carrot as a base in this recipe as it adds sweetness and gives the sambal a fantastically bright colour, but you could experiment with other bases such as green mango or pineapple. Try green or yellow chillies too.

With fruit-based sambals, you may need to add more vinegar to loosen them. Keep tasting and adjusting the sugar/salt ratio until you’re happy with the flavour.” p63

Chilli Sambal

Sterilise your jars and lids (see page 212).

Roughly chop the chillies, carrot, ginger and garlic cloves. Place in a food processor with the sugar and
salt and blitz for 5 minutes. Slowly pour in the vinegar until your sambal has a smooth consistency; you may need to adjust the quantity.

When the jars are cool enough to handle, pack the sambal into the jars, pressing down firmly to make sure the chilli paste is covered in a thin layer of liquid.

Remove any air bubbles by gently tapping each jar on the work surface and sliding a clean butter knife or chopstick around the inside to release any hidden air pockets. Wipe the rims of the jars with paper towel or a clean damp cloth and seal immediately.

You can store the sambal in the fridge for up to 3 months, or heat-process the jars (see page 211) for 10 minutes and store in a cool, dark place for up to 2 years.

Once opened, refrigerate and use within 3 months.

 

 

TIP: If your chillies are extra hot, you can always change the ratio of the sambal. Try 500 g (1 lb 2 oz) carrot to 500 g (1 lb 2 oz) chillies – or even 750 g (1 lb 10 oz) carrot to 250 g (9 oz) chillies.

 

The First of the Summer Veggies Have Been Picked

I love the summer garden – stone fruit, tomatoes, capsicum, coriander (cilantro), cucumber… and the obligatory tonne of zucchini – to eat, freeze, giveaway and pickle.

 

garden 24/11/017

 

Recently I have come across the most useful book: Cornersmith  Salads and Pickles – Alex Elliott-Howery and Sabine Spindler.

CrnrSmthSaladsPickles

This book is amazing, just what I need. I am not a naturally inspired salad maker – but I want to make inviting salads  and vegetable dishes that say eat me. It has recipes for yummy meals and guides for pickling and fermenting (good for the gut) which are great ways to store and use up our abundant seasonal fresh produce.

The Cornersmith way of eating sounds like a perfect match for me (and you): “The Cornersmith way to eat is about bringing together a variety of deliciously simple elements. Make one or two vegetable dishes, open a jar of pickles or ferments, add a good loaf of bread and perhaps an easy protein – a great piece of cheese, some eggs, a slice of grilled meat or fish. No diets, no superfoods, no guilt… Just good food with more taste and the added benefit of cutting down food waste. From the award-winning Cornersmith cafes and Picklery comes the follow-up to their bestselling self-titled cookbook, with a focus on seasonal salads, pickles and preserving. Including dozens of simple ideas for fresh ingredients that might otherwise be thrown away, Cornersmith: Salads & Pickles is your handbook to putting vegetables at the centre of the way you  eat.” 

 

https://www.murdochbooks.com.au/browse/books/cooking-food-drink/general-cookery-recipes/Cornersmith-Salads-and-Pickles-Alex-Elliott-Howery-and-Sabine-Spindler-9781743369234

 

 

 

Poppy and the Orchestra, Poppy and the Brass Band – Illustrated by Magali Le Huche

 

Poppy and the Orchestra

Poppy and the Orchestra

Waler Foster Jnr, Illustrated by Magali Le Huche

Allen & Unwin Australia

Quarto Group USA

ISBN: 9781633224018

 

Description:

Go on a musical adventure to the symphony with the adorable dog, Poppy, and see as she meets new friends who introduce her to the sounds of musical instruments.

 

With 16 buttons to push and hear, kids will love listening to the sounds of the different instruments as they follow along with the story. With colorful illustrations and a new sound to discover on each page, both kids and parents will be entertained and engaged for hours.

 

Poppy and the Orchestra offers an opportunity to teach kids about classical music and the instruments of the orchestra. Now that is truly unique!

 

 

Poppy and the Brass Band

Poppy and the Brass Band

Waler Foster Jnr, Illustrated by Magali Le Huche

Allen & Unwin Australia

Quarto Group USA

ISBN: 9781633224025

 

Description:

There really is no better way to introduce young children to the full-bodied sound of a brass band than with the story of an excited puppy and 16 sound effects. Poppy and the Brass Band has it all.

 

Go on a musical adventure to the circus with an adorable pup named Poppy. Poppy and the Brass Band takes kids on an adventure with Poppy she meets new friends who introduce her to the sounds of the musical instruments of a brass band. With 16 buttons to push and hear, children will be whisked to a different world while listening to the sounds of the different instruments and follow along with the story.

 

With colorful illustrations and a new sound to discover on each page, both kids and parents will be entertained and engaged from cover to cover. Poppy and the Brass Band offers an opportunity to teach kids about classical music and the instruments in a brass band.

 

My View:

These books have been a lifesaver! This week our grandson has been sick with a virus, he has not been his usual happy self and it has taken a lot of effort to keep him entertained – then these two books arrived in the mail! Allen & Unwin Australia you could not have known how perfectly timed their arrival was.  Our grandson is intrigued with these books; he sat quietly and focused on the sounds and the “pushing” to control the “sounds” himself, he listened, he giggled and jiggled to the music as he sat on our laps, or next to us as we read him the story and played the tunes.  He has enjoyed this book, over and over and overJ  These are unique musical books that entertain and educate.

 

Olive Oil Rosemary Apricot Cake: Poh Bakes 100 Greats – Poh Ling Yeow

Poh Bakes_CVR

Images and recipes from Poh Bakes 100 Greats by Poh Ling Yeow (Murdoch Books, RRP $39.99) Photography by Alan Benson.

 

Olive Oil Rosemary Apricot Cake

 

“For the non-sweet tooths out there, this one’s for you. This savoury combination of olive oil, rosemary and lemon in a cake is just sensational and so wonderfully Mediterranean.  If you are desperate to make this outside of apricot season, apricot halves tinned in syrup make a good substitute.

 

Olive Oil Rosemary Apricot Cake_pg185

Feeds 10–12

 

ingredients

5 eggs, separated

165 g (53/4 oz/ 3/4 cup) caster (superfine) sugar + extra 1 tablespoon, to sprinkle

1/4 teaspoon salt

185 ml (6 fl oz/ 3/4 cup) olive oil

Finely grated zest & juice of 1 lemon

1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh rosemary

150 g (51/2 oz/1 cup) plain (all-purpose) flour, sifted

10 apricots, halved & stones removed, or tinned apricot halves, drained

 

To serve

1 quantity Vanilla Sour Cream or Vanilla Crème Fraîche (for both, see page 203) or Yoghurt Mascarpone Cream (see page 206)

 

method

 

Preheat the oven to 170°C (325°F) fan-forced. Grease the ring of a 20–22 cm (8–81/2 inch) springform tin, then turn the base upside down, so it no longer has a lip. Place a piece of baking paper over it, then clamp the ring around it to secure.

 

To make the cake, in a medium mixing bowl, whisk the egg whites with an electric mixer on medium speed until just foamy. Add only 55 g (2 oz/ 1/4 cup) of the caster sugar in two batches, whisking well between each addition, until soft peaks form. Set aside.

 

Combine the egg yolks, remaining caster sugar and salt in a medium mixing bowl, and whisk with an electric mixer on high speed until pale and thick. Gradually drizzle in the olive oil, whisking on high speed until all of it has been used. Add the lemon zest and juice, rosemary and flour, and stir with a whisk until just combined. Whisk in one-third of the egg whites to loosen the mixture, then add the remainder and stir very gently with the whisk until combined.

 

Pour the batter into the prepared cake tin, and arrange the apricot halves in concentric circles on top, working from the outside in. Sprinkle the extra 1 tablespoon caster sugar evenly over the surface, and bake for about 50 minutes, or until an inserted skewer comes
out clean. Rest the cake in the tin for 5 minutes, before releasing
the ring and sliding the cake onto a wire rack to cool. Rest for about
30 minutes, before slicing and serving with your choice of dolloping cream – warm works for this cake!

 

 

 

Page 203:

 

Dolloping Creams

 

With all the different styles of dolloping cream, you should know you don’t actually need a recipe. All you want is to remember the ratio. Rule of thumb is icing sugar will always be 10% of the cream amount no matter what. For example, you would mix 30 g (1 oz) icing sugar with 300 ml (101/2 fl oz) of cream, then it’s generally 1–11/2 teaspoons vanilla extract or to taste. With the cultured creams, you could probably add a smidgen more icing sugar to balance the sharpness but, as is, they will be especially perfect for those who prefer things not overly sweet.

 

Makes about 300 ml (101/2 fl oz)

 

Crème Chantilly

300 ml (101/2 fl oz) thickened (whipping) cream

30 g (1 oz/ 1/4 cup) pure icing (confectioners’) sugar or icing (confectioners’) sugar mixture, sifted

1 teaspoon vanilla extract OR vanilla bean paste or vanilla essence

 

Vanilla Sour Cream or Vanilla crème Fraîche

Sour cream and crème fraîche are the next options. Both of these
are cultured creams, so have a desirable sharpness that is great for cutting through sweet things, but they differ in fat content.

Sour cream has a lower fat content, which means it does not whip. It’s structurally more similar to yoghurt, so you get a more runny finish that will separate if left for a while. Sour cream is also easier to find.

Crème fraîche, on the other hand, can be whipped because of its higher fat content, but it will only be to soft to medium peaks.

To make Vanilla Sour Cream, use the crème Chantilly recipe, but swap out the cream for sour cream, and stir with a spoon to combine.

To make Vanilla Crème Fraîche, use the crème Chantilly recipe, but swap out the cream for crème fraîche, and hand-whisk to soft or medium peaks. This will split if you overwhisk it, and the only remedy is to start again with fresh ingredients.

 

Page 206:

 

Yoghurt Mascarpone Cream

 

I love the look of surprise on people’s faces when I give them a spoonful of this. They expect ‘rich’ and they expect ‘cream’, but what’s wonderful is that, instead, they get this light, mildly sharp, vanilla-y, subtly sweet cultured flavour that, to be honest, trumps a conventional crème Chantilly in most cases. It doesn’t always hold well, depending on what brands of yoghurt and mascarpone you use, so it’s not good for engineering anything that needs to be structurally sound such as between layers of cake. It’s best for dolloping generously on things like pavlova or other meringue desserts, slices of tea cake or poached fruit.

 

Makes about 500 ml (17 fl oz/2 cups)

 

 

ingredients

250 g (9 oz/1 cup) mascarpone cheese

250 g (9 oz/1 cup) Greek-style yoghurt

50 g (13/4 oz) icing (confectioners’) sugar mixture

1–2 teaspoons vanilla bean paste OR vanilla extract

 

method

Combine all the ingredients in a medium mixing bowl, and whisk until smooth. This will keep perfectly for up to 2 weeks, seeing as both the cheese and the yoghurt are cultured forms of dairy.

 

Post Script: Poh Bakes 100 Greats – Poh Ling Yeow

Poh Bakes_CVR

Poh Bakes 100 Greats

Poh Ling Yeow

Murdoch Books

ISBN: 9781743366264

 

Description:

‘I love baking so much I’ve been known to park myself in front of the oven to watch a cake cook, like television.’

 

Poh first fell in love with food by learning to bake as a nine year old – she remembers vividly her mum showing her the art of folding flour into her first sponge cake ‘just like so’ and the skill in lining a tin meticulously. Now, years after Poh’s meteoric rise to fame through MasterChef, and hosting her own television shows, Poh’s Kitchen and Poh & Co, she returns to her roots, with wooden spoon and mixing bowl in hand. Poh owns and runs Adelaide destination cafe and bakery Jamface, with her bestie, Sarah. She describes the Jamface baking philosophy as the love child between a Parisian patisserie and the Country Women’s Association. Here, she shares recipes for 100 of her favourite baked delights.

 

So take the afternoon off, fire up the oven, and join Poh in the meditative process of baking something truly great.

 

My View:
I think this has to be one of the best all round, accessible baking books of the year. It includes chapters on:

  • Savoury Starters
  • Bake Sale Beauties
  • French Fundamentals
  • Sweetie Pies & Tantalising Tarts
  • Oldies But Goodies
  • Thrills & Frills
  • Adventure Bakes
  • Trusty Tea Cakes
  • Must Knows.

 

Included in the 100 recipes are some of my favourite foods including:

*Hummingbird Cake

*Coconut Ice

*Pecan Cinnamon Scrolls

*Basic Nut Praline

*Bienenstich –Bee Sting Cake

*Turkish Delight

*Brioche Buns

*Baked Camembert with Thyme, Garlic & Red Wine

*Hero No Need Crusty Bread

*Smoked Salmon & Zucchini Slice….

 

And many many more. I am sure you will find your new favourite in this book J

 

PS and there is even a recipe for your favourite pet!