When Life Gives You…

pickles

 

When life gives you zucchinis, make zucchinni pickle with chilli & mint (p.51)  Thanks Cornersmith Salad and Pickles. 🙂

 

CrnrSmthSaladsPickles

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Mango Chutney: Cornersmith Salads & Pickles Vegatables with More Taste and Less Waste – Alex Elliott- Howery & Sabine Spindler

 

CrnrSmthSaladsPickles

Images and recipes from Cornersmith Salads and Pickles by Alex Elliott-Howery and Sabine Spindler (Murdoch Books, RRP $39.99) Photography by Alan Benson.

 

Mango chutney

 

PREPARATION TIME

20 minutes, plus 20 minutes sterilising, plus 10 minutes heat-processing (optional)

COOKING TIME

about 1¼ hours

STORAGE

3 months, or
up to 2 years if heat-processed

MAKES

4 x 300 ml (10½ fl oz) jars

 

1.8–2 kg (4 lb–4 lb 8 oz) sweet, ripe mangoes; you’ll need about 1.2 kg (2 lb 10 oz)
sliced mango

1 brown onion

1 red onion

80 ml (2½ fl oz/⅓ cup) olive, sunflower or vegetable oil

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds

1 teaspoon brown mustard seeds

1 teaspoon ground coriander

11/2 teaspoons ground ginger

1 teaspoon chilli flakes

¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper

300 ml (10½ fl oz) apple cider vinegar

110 g (3¾ oz/½ cup) sugar

 

When mangoes are cheap or you have a neighbourhood mango tree that is dropping fruit faster than you can eat it, make this chutney! It’s delicious with curries and seafood and makes a great gift. This one has a bit of heat to it, but you can leave the chilli flakes out if you’re after something milder.” p.60

 

Cut the mangoes into 3 cm (1¼ inch) cubes and discard the peel and stones. Very thinly slice the onions.

Measure out the spices and set aside.

Heat the oil in a large non-reactive saucepan. Add the onions and sauté with the salt over medium–low heat for about 8 minutes, until soft and collapsed. Add the spices and stir for a minute or two, until fragrant.

Add the mango and stir until the spices are evenly mixed through. Add the vinegar and sugar, stirring to dissolve the sugar.

Cook over low heat, stirring regularly to make sure the chutney isn’t sticking, for up to 1 hour, or until the chutney is glossy and thick, with no puddles of liquid on the surface. Taste and add more spices or salt if needed, then turn off the heat and leave to cool for a minute or two.

Meanwhile, sterilise your jars and lids (see page 212), putting the jars in the oven about 15 minutes before the chutney has finished cooking.

Fill the hot jars with the hot chutney. Remove any air bubbles by gently tapping each jar on the work surface and sliding a clean butter knife around the inside to release any hidden air pockets. Wipe the rims of the jars with paper towel or a clean damp cloth and seal immediately.

Leave to cool on the benchtop, then store in a cool, dark place for up to 3 months. To extend the shelf life to 2 years, heat-process the jars (see page 211) for 10 minutes.

Try to let the chutney sit for 1 month before you eat it. Once opened, refrigerate and use within 3 months.

 

Mango chutney

Broad Bean & Pea Salad with Freekeh & Yoghurt Sauce: Cornersmith Salads & Pickles Vegatables with More Taste and Less Waste – Alex Elliott- Howery & Sabine Spindler

CrnrSmthSaladsPicklesImages and recipes from Cornersmith Salads and Pickles by Alex Elliott-Howery and Sabine Spindler (Murdoch Books, RRP $39.99) Photography by Alan Benson.

 

Broad bean & pea salad with freekeh & yoghurt sauce

 

Broad bean

PREPARATION TIME

25 minutes, plus overnight soaking

COOKING TIME

25 minutes

SERVES

4

 

160 g (5½ oz/¾ cup) freekeh, soaked overnight

125 g (4½ oz) podded fresh peas

350 g (12 oz) podded fresh broad beans

60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) olive oil, plus extra for drizzling over
the salad

1 large brown onion, thinly sliced

1½ tablespoons chopped dill, including the stems

juice of ½–1 lemon, to taste

⅓ cup picked dill and mint leaves, torn just before serving

ground sumac, for sprinkling (optional)

 

yoghurt sauce

200 g (7 oz/¾ cup) natural unsweetened yoghurt

2 garlic cloves, crushed

pinch of salt

pinch of chilli powder or  cayenne pepper

 

When it’s broad bean and pea season, you should eat them every day! This salad stars freekeh, a delicious, highly nutritious grain made from roasted green (early harvest) wheat. If you can’t obtain it, use barley, spelt or other grains instead.

This salad looks great on a large flat platter. You could also double the quantity and take it to a barbecue or picnic.” p.12

 

Bring a saucepan of salted water to the boil. Drain and rinse the freekeh, add it to the pan and cook for
6–8 minutes, or until the grains are just tender, but still retain their shape. Drain and set aside to cool.

Meanwhile, bring another saucepan of water to the boil. Blanch the peas for 1 minute, then remove
with a slotted spoon. Refresh them under cold water, drain well and set aside.

Bring the water back to the boil and blanch the broad beans for about 2 minutes. Drain, then refresh under cold water. When cool enough to handle, peel off and discard the outer skin. Set the broad beans
aside, keeping them separate to the peas.

Combine the yoghurt sauce ingredients in a bowl, mixing until smooth. Set aside.

Pour the olive oil into a frying pan large enough to hold the broad beans in one flat layer. Heat over medium–high heat. Add the onion, season with salt and pepper, then let it soften over medium–low heat
for 5–10 minutes, stirring now and then.

Turn the heat back up to high. Add the broad beans and stir-fry for 2–4 minutes, or until they turn golden brown. Add the chopped dill and turn off the heat.

In a mixing bowl, combine the fried broad beans and peas. Season with salt, pepper and lemon juice to taste.

To serve, spread the cooked freekeh on a platter, arrange the broad beans and peas on top and drizzle
with the yoghurt sauce. Finish with the torn dill and mint, a sprinkling of sumac, if desired, and an extra drizzle of olive oil.

Chilli Sambal: Cornersmith Salads & Pickles Vegatables with More Taste and Less Waste – Alex Elliott- Howery & Sabine Spindler

CrnrSmthSaladsPickles

Images and recipes from Cornersmith Salads and Pickles by Alex Elliott-Howery and Sabine Spindler (Murdoch Books, RRP $39.99) Photography by Alan Benson.

 

Chilli sambal

 

PREPARATION TIME

20 minutes, plus 20 minutes sterilising, plus 10 minutes heat-processing (optional)

STORAGE

3 months,
or up to 2 years
if heat-processed

MAKES

4–5 x 375 ml  (13 fl oz/11/2 cup) jars

 

750 g (1 lb 10 oz) long mild red chillies

250 g (9 oz) carrot

50 g (1¾ oz) knob of fresh ginger

4 garlic cloves

55 g (2 oz/¼ cup) sugar

1 tablespoon salt

185 ml (6 fl oz/3/4 cup) white wine vinegar

 

We make mountains of this sambal when chilli season is in full swing. It’s a staple at Cornersmith, and in all our fridges at home. So quick and easy to make, it gives tacos, rice dishes, marinades and breakfast eggs a good hit of heat.

We use carrot as a base in this recipe as it adds sweetness and gives the sambal a fantastically bright colour, but you could experiment with other bases such as green mango or pineapple. Try green or yellow chillies too.

With fruit-based sambals, you may need to add more vinegar to loosen them. Keep tasting and adjusting the sugar/salt ratio until you’re happy with the flavour.” p63

Chilli Sambal

Sterilise your jars and lids (see page 212).

Roughly chop the chillies, carrot, ginger and garlic cloves. Place in a food processor with the sugar and
salt and blitz for 5 minutes. Slowly pour in the vinegar until your sambal has a smooth consistency; you may need to adjust the quantity.

When the jars are cool enough to handle, pack the sambal into the jars, pressing down firmly to make sure the chilli paste is covered in a thin layer of liquid.

Remove any air bubbles by gently tapping each jar on the work surface and sliding a clean butter knife or chopstick around the inside to release any hidden air pockets. Wipe the rims of the jars with paper towel or a clean damp cloth and seal immediately.

You can store the sambal in the fridge for up to 3 months, or heat-process the jars (see page 211) for 10 minutes and store in a cool, dark place for up to 2 years.

Once opened, refrigerate and use within 3 months.

 

 

TIP: If your chillies are extra hot, you can always change the ratio of the sambal. Try 500 g (1 lb 2 oz) carrot to 500 g (1 lb 2 oz) chillies – or even 750 g (1 lb 10 oz) carrot to 250 g (9 oz) chillies.

 

The First of the Summer Veggies Have Been Picked

I love the summer garden – stone fruit, tomatoes, capsicum, coriander (cilantro), cucumber… and the obligatory tonne of zucchini – to eat, freeze, giveaway and pickle.

 

garden 24/11/017

 

Recently I have come across the most useful book: Cornersmith  Salads and Pickles – Alex Elliott-Howery and Sabine Spindler.

CrnrSmthSaladsPickles

This book is amazing, just what I need. I am not a naturally inspired salad maker – but I want to make inviting salads  and vegetable dishes that say eat me. It has recipes for yummy meals and guides for pickling and fermenting (good for the gut) which are great ways to store and use up our abundant seasonal fresh produce.

The Cornersmith way of eating sounds like a perfect match for me (and you): “The Cornersmith way to eat is about bringing together a variety of deliciously simple elements. Make one or two vegetable dishes, open a jar of pickles or ferments, add a good loaf of bread and perhaps an easy protein – a great piece of cheese, some eggs, a slice of grilled meat or fish. No diets, no superfoods, no guilt… Just good food with more taste and the added benefit of cutting down food waste. From the award-winning Cornersmith cafes and Picklery comes the follow-up to their bestselling self-titled cookbook, with a focus on seasonal salads, pickles and preserving. Including dozens of simple ideas for fresh ingredients that might otherwise be thrown away, Cornersmith: Salads & Pickles is your handbook to putting vegetables at the centre of the way you  eat.” 

 

https://www.murdochbooks.com.au/browse/books/cooking-food-drink/general-cookery-recipes/Cornersmith-Salads-and-Pickles-Alex-Elliott-Howery-and-Sabine-Spindler-9781743369234

 

 

 

Olive Oil Rosemary Apricot Cake: Poh Bakes 100 Greats – Poh Ling Yeow

Poh Bakes_CVR

Images and recipes from Poh Bakes 100 Greats by Poh Ling Yeow (Murdoch Books, RRP $39.99) Photography by Alan Benson.

 

Olive Oil Rosemary Apricot Cake

 

“For the non-sweet tooths out there, this one’s for you. This savoury combination of olive oil, rosemary and lemon in a cake is just sensational and so wonderfully Mediterranean.  If you are desperate to make this outside of apricot season, apricot halves tinned in syrup make a good substitute.

 

Olive Oil Rosemary Apricot Cake_pg185

Feeds 10–12

 

ingredients

5 eggs, separated

165 g (53/4 oz/ 3/4 cup) caster (superfine) sugar + extra 1 tablespoon, to sprinkle

1/4 teaspoon salt

185 ml (6 fl oz/ 3/4 cup) olive oil

Finely grated zest & juice of 1 lemon

1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh rosemary

150 g (51/2 oz/1 cup) plain (all-purpose) flour, sifted

10 apricots, halved & stones removed, or tinned apricot halves, drained

 

To serve

1 quantity Vanilla Sour Cream or Vanilla Crème Fraîche (for both, see page 203) or Yoghurt Mascarpone Cream (see page 206)

 

method

 

Preheat the oven to 170°C (325°F) fan-forced. Grease the ring of a 20–22 cm (8–81/2 inch) springform tin, then turn the base upside down, so it no longer has a lip. Place a piece of baking paper over it, then clamp the ring around it to secure.

 

To make the cake, in a medium mixing bowl, whisk the egg whites with an electric mixer on medium speed until just foamy. Add only 55 g (2 oz/ 1/4 cup) of the caster sugar in two batches, whisking well between each addition, until soft peaks form. Set aside.

 

Combine the egg yolks, remaining caster sugar and salt in a medium mixing bowl, and whisk with an electric mixer on high speed until pale and thick. Gradually drizzle in the olive oil, whisking on high speed until all of it has been used. Add the lemon zest and juice, rosemary and flour, and stir with a whisk until just combined. Whisk in one-third of the egg whites to loosen the mixture, then add the remainder and stir very gently with the whisk until combined.

 

Pour the batter into the prepared cake tin, and arrange the apricot halves in concentric circles on top, working from the outside in. Sprinkle the extra 1 tablespoon caster sugar evenly over the surface, and bake for about 50 minutes, or until an inserted skewer comes
out clean. Rest the cake in the tin for 5 minutes, before releasing
the ring and sliding the cake onto a wire rack to cool. Rest for about
30 minutes, before slicing and serving with your choice of dolloping cream – warm works for this cake!

 

 

 

Page 203:

 

Dolloping Creams

 

With all the different styles of dolloping cream, you should know you don’t actually need a recipe. All you want is to remember the ratio. Rule of thumb is icing sugar will always be 10% of the cream amount no matter what. For example, you would mix 30 g (1 oz) icing sugar with 300 ml (101/2 fl oz) of cream, then it’s generally 1–11/2 teaspoons vanilla extract or to taste. With the cultured creams, you could probably add a smidgen more icing sugar to balance the sharpness but, as is, they will be especially perfect for those who prefer things not overly sweet.

 

Makes about 300 ml (101/2 fl oz)

 

Crème Chantilly

300 ml (101/2 fl oz) thickened (whipping) cream

30 g (1 oz/ 1/4 cup) pure icing (confectioners’) sugar or icing (confectioners’) sugar mixture, sifted

1 teaspoon vanilla extract OR vanilla bean paste or vanilla essence

 

Vanilla Sour Cream or Vanilla crème Fraîche

Sour cream and crème fraîche are the next options. Both of these
are cultured creams, so have a desirable sharpness that is great for cutting through sweet things, but they differ in fat content.

Sour cream has a lower fat content, which means it does not whip. It’s structurally more similar to yoghurt, so you get a more runny finish that will separate if left for a while. Sour cream is also easier to find.

Crème fraîche, on the other hand, can be whipped because of its higher fat content, but it will only be to soft to medium peaks.

To make Vanilla Sour Cream, use the crème Chantilly recipe, but swap out the cream for sour cream, and stir with a spoon to combine.

To make Vanilla Crème Fraîche, use the crème Chantilly recipe, but swap out the cream for crème fraîche, and hand-whisk to soft or medium peaks. This will split if you overwhisk it, and the only remedy is to start again with fresh ingredients.

 

Page 206:

 

Yoghurt Mascarpone Cream

 

I love the look of surprise on people’s faces when I give them a spoonful of this. They expect ‘rich’ and they expect ‘cream’, but what’s wonderful is that, instead, they get this light, mildly sharp, vanilla-y, subtly sweet cultured flavour that, to be honest, trumps a conventional crème Chantilly in most cases. It doesn’t always hold well, depending on what brands of yoghurt and mascarpone you use, so it’s not good for engineering anything that needs to be structurally sound such as between layers of cake. It’s best for dolloping generously on things like pavlova or other meringue desserts, slices of tea cake or poached fruit.

 

Makes about 500 ml (17 fl oz/2 cups)

 

 

ingredients

250 g (9 oz/1 cup) mascarpone cheese

250 g (9 oz/1 cup) Greek-style yoghurt

50 g (13/4 oz) icing (confectioners’) sugar mixture

1–2 teaspoons vanilla bean paste OR vanilla extract

 

method

Combine all the ingredients in a medium mixing bowl, and whisk until smooth. This will keep perfectly for up to 2 weeks, seeing as both the cheese and the yoghurt are cultured forms of dairy.

 

Rhino & Tim’s Chicken Liver Treats (Dog Biscuits): Poh Bakes 100 Greats- Poh Ling Yeow

Poh Bakes_CVR

Images and recipes from Poh Bakes 100 Greats by Poh Ling Yeow (Murdoch Books, RRP $39.99) Photography by Alan Benson.

 

Rhino & Tim’s Chicken Liver Treats

 

First, let’s be clear, these biscuits are for dogs, not humans! If you’re like me and get a bit stressy about the dodgy regulations that surround pet food, you can make your own. My guys, Rhino and Tim, are totally obsessed with these, and the best thing is that they’re incredibly easy to whip up.

 

MAKES ABOUT 1 KG (2 LB 4 OZ) DOG BISCUITS

 Dog Biscuits_pg53

INGREDIENTS

600 g (1 lb 5 oz/4 cups) wholemeal (whole-wheat) flour + extra for sprinkling

165 g (53/4 oz/1 1/2 cups) powdered milk

75 g (21/2 oz/1 cup) wheat germ

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

500 g (1 lb 2 oz) chicken livers

3 eggs

30 g (1 oz/1 cup) roughly chopped flat-leaf (Italian) parsley, including stalks

 

METHOD

Preheat the oven to 110°C (225°F) fan-forced.

 

Combine all the dry ingredients in a food processor, and pulse very briefly to mix. Add the livers, eggs and parsley, then pulse until the mixture gathers into a rough dough.

 

Turn out onto a floured work surface, sprinkle more wholemeal flour on top and roll until 6 mm (1/4 inch) thick. Slice roughly into 4 cm (11/2 inch) squares, and bake for 1–11/2 hours until dry and crunchy. If the bikkies seem a little rubbery when you take them out of the oven, don’t be concerned – they’ll turn super-crunchy on cooling.

 

Cool completely before storing in an airtight container, then use freely to manipulate your fur children into good behaviour! These keep well in an airtight container for up to 2 months.

 

NOTE

Just so you know, these dog biscuits are designed to be used as treats, not a kibble substitute.