No-Bake Poached Pear Flan with Lime Cream: The Good Carbs Cookbook by Dr. Alan Barclay, Kate McGhie & Philippa Sandall

Good Carbs Cookbook

Images and recipes from The Good Carbs Cookbook by Dr. Alan Barclay, Kate McGhie & Philippa Sandall Murdoch Books RRP $$39.99 Photography by Alan Benson

 

No-bake Poached Pear Flan with Lime Cream

“Sometimes a traditional pastry crust just doesn’t do justice to a spectacular filling. This is one of those times. This no-need-to-cook food processor pastry is chock full of flavour, and is refrigerated so it can be prepared the day before. So too can the ‘creamy’ cheese filling. Each pear variety has its own personality in texture and flavour. Choose a mild and sweet variety with subtle, fragrant citrus notes – bartlett pear comes to mind.” p.224

 

No Bake Poached Pear Flan With Lime Cream

PREPARATION TIME: 30 minutes | COOKING TIME: 15 minutes | SERVES: 8

 

1 cup (65 g/2¼ oz) shredded coconut

100 g (3½ oz) hazelnuts or almonds

12 pitted soft dates, chopped

1 teaspoon finely grated ginger, plus
2 cm (¾ in) piece ginger, peeled

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

4 medium pears

½ cup (110 g/3¾ oz) caster (superfine) sugar

2 whole star anise

1 small lime, thinly sliced

2 cups (500 ml/17 fl oz) soda water (club soda)

 

Lime cream 

¾ cup (200 g/7 oz) ricotta

½ cup (100 g/3½ oz) reduced-fat cream cheese

½ cup (130 g/4½ oz) natural yoghurt

1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest

2 tablespoons warmed honey

 

Line a 23 cm (9 in) flan (tart) pan with baking paper with overhanging sides to make it easy to lift the flan out. Put the coconut in a food processor and blitz until fine. Add the hazelnuts, dates, finely grated ginger and cinnamon and pulse to a fine-crumb texture. Don’t worry if it is a bit more coarse than fine.

Tip the mixture into a bowl and, using your hands, clump it together and press it evenly into the base and sides of the prepared tin.  Refrigerate for about 20 minutes, until firm.

Peel the pears, cut into thick wedges and remove the core (leave the stalk on for decoration if you like). Put the sugar, peeled ginger, star anise, lime and soda water in a large pan. Stir over medium heat until the sugar dissolves, then reduce the heat to low and drop in the pears.

Cover the pan and gently simmer for about 10 minutes, or until the pears are just tender. Remove the pan from the heat and leave the pears to cool in the liquor. Lift the pears out with a slotted spoon and drain well.

Whisk together the ricotta, cream cheese, yoghurt, lime zest and 1½ tablespoons of the honey until smooth and creamy. Spoon the mixture into the flan and arrange the pears on top. Brush the pears with the remaining honey.

 

 

Farro and Green Lentils: The Good Carbs Cook Book -Dr Alan Barclay, Kate McGhie & Philippa Sandall

Good Carbs Cookbook

Images and recipes from The Good Carbs Cookbook by Dr. Alan Barclay, Kate McGhie & Philippa Sandall Murdoch Books RRP $$39.99 Photography by Alan Benson

 

Farro and Green Lentils with Cherry Tomatoes and Marinated Feta 

 

“This is a crunchy–squishy salad, for which the lentils and farro can be prepared ahead of time and, at the last minute, everything tossed together. Unlike some other grains, farro is hard to overcook.” p.162

 

PREPARATION TIME: 20 minutes | COOKING TIME: 40 minutes | SERVES: 6

 

1 cup (180 g/6 oz) small green lentils

1 cup (180 g/6 oz) farro

¼ cup (60 ml/2 fl oz) lemon juice

3 garlic cloves, crushed

½ cup (125 ml/4 fl oz) extra virgin olive oil

sea salt flakes and freshly ground pepper

400 g (14 oz) ripe cherry tomatoes, halved

1 small red onion, finely diced

1 large handful mixed herbs (parsley, thyme, chives), chopped

¾ cup (90 g/3¼ oz) crumbled marinated soft feta

Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to the boil. Add the lentils and simmer for about 20 minutes. Rinse the farro and add to the pan. Simmer for 20 minutes or until the farro and lentils are tender. Drain well.

Meanwhile, whisk together the lemon juice, garlic and oil, and add salt and pepper to taste. Put the cherry tomatoes in a large bowl.

Tip the lentils and farro into the bowl with the tomatoes, pour over the dressing with the onion and herbs and gently toss. Pile on a large serving dish with the feta spooned over the top and garnished with extra herbs.

 

 

Lemon Chicken with Golden Onions and Green Olives: The Good Carbs Cook Book -Dr Alan Barclay, Kate McGhie & Philippa Sandall

Good Carbs Cookbook

 

Images and recipes from The Good Carbs Cookbook by Dr. Alan Barclay, Kate McGhie & Philippa Sandall Murdoch Books RRP $$39.99 Photography by Alan Benson

 

Lemon Chicken with Golden Onions and Green Olives

“With a nod to an unctuous Moroccan tagine, the spice mix is mild and the turmeric produces a gorgeous golden colour in the onions when the chicken is cooked. Ground ginger withstands higher cooking temperatures than fresh ginger, without changing its flavour.” p.56

 

Lemon Chicken Cooked In A Spice Paste With-Golden Onions And Green Olives

PREPARATION TIME: 25 minutes | COOKING TIME: 1 hour | SERVES: 6

3 garlic cloves, crushed
1 teaspoon ground cumin
½ teaspoon ground chilli
2 teaspoons ground turmeric
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1 handful coriander (cilantro) leaves and stems, chopped, plus extra, finely chopped, to garnish
1 handful parsley, chopped
¼ cup (60 ml/2 fl oz) lemon juice
½ cup (125 ml/4 fl oz) olive oil
4 skinless bone-in chicken thighs
4 skinless bone-in chicken drumsticks
5 medium onions, thinly sliced
sea salt flakes
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1 lemon, thinly sliced
1 cup (250 ml/9 fl oz) water
1 cup (180 g/6½ oz) pitted green olives

 

Combine the garlic, cumin, chilli, turmeric, pepper, coriander, parsley, lemon juice and 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large bowl. Add the chicken and toss until evenly coated in the spice paste. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and marinate in the refrigerator for 4 hours.

Heat 2 tablespoons of the remaining oil in a large sturdy heatproof pan over medium–high heat. Working in batches, add the chicken pieces and fry for about 10 minutes, turning once until golden brown on both sides. Transfer the chicken to a plate and cover loosely with foil to keep warm.

Put the onions in the pan with the remaining oil and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions soften.

Return the chicken to the pan with the ginger, lemon and water. Bring to a lively simmer and then reduce the heat to medium–low and cook, covered, for about 40 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through. Test by piercing the meat near the bone with a fine skewer and if the juices run clear, the chicken is cooked.

Remove from the heat and scatter with the olives and extra coriander.

Lovely served with couscous or brown rice.

 

Post Script: The Good Carbs Cook Book – Dr Alan Barclay, Kate McGhie & Philippa Sandall

Good Carbs Cookbook

The Good Carbs Cook Book

Dr Alan Barclay, Kate McGhie, Philippa Sandall

Murdoch Books

ISBN: 9781743368169

 

Description:

100+ simple, delicious and satisfying recipes to keep you feeling fuller for longer.

Good carbs are essential. They supply the feel-good, taste-good fuel to keep you strong, boost your energy and help you stay healthy.

 

The Good Carbs Cookbook helps you choose the best fruits, vegetables, beans, peas, lentils, seeds, nuts and grains and explains how to use them in 100 refreshingly nourishing recipes to enjoy every day, for breakfast, brunch, lunch, dinner and dessert. The recipes have short ingredients lists, are easy to prepare, quick to cook, long in flavour and full of sustaining goodness, so you feel fuller for longer. There is a nutritional analysis for each recipe and there are tips and helpful hints for the novice, nervous, curious or time-starved cook.

 

 

My View:

This book celebrates the notion “Eat foods made from ingredients you can picture in their raw state or growing in nature.”(p.9 Michael Pollan) and if you adopt this principle you cannot go wrong as Dr Alan Barclay, Kate McGhie and Philippa Sandall demonstrate.

 

This book is full of useful advice, tips on cooking, storing, nutritional information on the featured ingredients and its “hero” recipes. In the introduction Barclay et al list 10 Things they “Love About Good Wholesome Carb Foods” – let me share that information with you:

  1. We love the way they power the brain.
  2. We love the way they fuel the body.
  3. We love the energy they give.
  4. We love the good stuff (vitamins and minerals) that comes with them.
  5. We love their keep-it-regular fibre habit.
  6. We love preparing meals for family and friends with them.
  7. We love traditional foods they put on a plate.
  8. We love the variety and pleasure they bring to the table.
  9. We love the way they feed the world.
  10. We love their lighter footprint on the planet.

 

 

I heartily agree with all of the points mentioned above. This book ticks all my home cooking needs and more (particularly points 6 and 8).  I can’t wait to try out some of the recipes here and to share some of the recipes with you. This book is a keeper.

 

 

 

 

Who Would Have Thought…

Who would have thought that tahini ( ground sesame seed paste) and maple syrup could  taste this good?  Today I made my first raw food dessert – raw caramel slice from  Vladia Cobrdova’s “A Whole New Way To Eat.”

I love the base- dates and almonds, the caramel – basically tahini, coconut oil and maple syrup and the choc top –  mostly just cocoa and coconut oil. YUM.  A little goes a long way – but  make sure you keep this in the fridge.  The recipe  states this will keep for up to three weeks in an airtight container in the fridge, which is good because this recipe made a huge amount.  If you are down this way – pop in for a coffee and a taste.

 

raw caramel slice

Brown Rice Kitchari: The Energy Guide – Dr Libby Weaver

The Energy Guide

 

The Energy Guide by Dr Libby Weaver is published by Macmillan Australia, RRP $39.99

 

Prep ahead:
• Soak rice and dhal
• Chop or grate broccoli
• Remove kernels from corn cob
• Grate zucchini and carrot
Cooking time: 40 minutes
Preparation time: 20 minutes, plus overnight soaking

 

Brown Rice Kitchari

 

BROWN RICE KITCHARI
Serves:6
1⁄2 cup (110 g) medium-grain brown rice
1⁄2 cup (105 g) split mung dhal (see Glossary)
2 tablespoons extra virgin coconut oil
1⁄3 cup (80 g) ghee (see Glossary)
1 brown onion, finely chopped
1 tablespoon grated ginger
1 tablespoon black mustard seeds
1 tablespoon black sesame seeds
2 teaspoons cumin seeds
2 teaspoons grated fresh turmeric or 1⁄2 teaspoon ground turmeric (see Glossary)
1 cup (85 g) grated or finely chopped broccoli
1 corn cob, kernels removed (1 cup/200 g)
2 zucchini, grated
2 carrots, grated
1.25 litres boiling water
sea salt
freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste
chopped coriander leaves, to serve

Kitchari is considered a food medicine, and this nourishing
meal is very gentle on the digestive system. It is delicious
reheated and can also be served as an accompaniment to
other dishes. Basmati rice can be used instead of the brown
rice and this will reduce the cooking time.”p.197
Wash the rice and dhal, then place in a bowl, cover with cold
water and leave to soak overnight. The next morning, rinse
and drain well.
Melt the coconut oil and half the ghee in a large deep frying
pan over medium heat, add the onion and ginger and cook for
10 minutes or until the onion is soft and golden – don’t rush this step
as the gently cooked onion adds a lovely sweetness to the dish.
Add the seeds and turmeric and cook for 1 minute or until the
seeds start to pop. Add the broccoli, corn, zucchini and carrot
and stir until the vegetables are well coated in the spices.
Stir in the drained rice and dhal, then add the boiling water and
a good pinch of salt. Bring to the boil over high heat and boil for
20 minutes or until tunnels form in the rice and most of the liquid
has been absorbed.

Reduce the heat to low, cover and cook gently for 5 minutes or until the rice is soft and there is no liquid
left in the pan. Stir through the remaining ghee, then finish with a good squeeze
of lemon and a scattering of coriander.

Salmon & Quinoa Fishcakes: The Energy Guide – Dr Libby Weaver

The Energy Guide

The Energy Guide by Dr Libby Weaver is published by Macmillan Australia, RRP $39.99

 

Salmon & Quinoa Fishcakes

Prep ahead:
• Steam sweet potato and salmon
• Cook quinoa
Cooking time:45 minutes
Preparation time: 20 minutes

 

 

Salmon & Quinoa Fishcakes
SALMON & QUINOA FISH CAKES
Serves: 4
300 g sweet potato, peeled and chopped
500 g skinless salmon fillet
½ cup (100 g) tricolour quinoa, rinsed well (see Glossary)
1 cup (120 g) almond meal
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 tablespoon red curry paste
100 g green beans, trimmed and thinly sliced
4 kaffir lime leaves, finely shredded (see Glossary)
finely grated zest and juice of 1 lime
2 tablespoons extra virgin coconut oil
salad greens and lime wedges (optional), to serve

Fish cakes are a great healthy staple. These have extra protein
from the quinoa, meaning they’re particularly satiating. Serve
them with additional greens or one of the salad recipes in this
book. The fish cakes can be frozen (cooked or uncooked) in an
airtight container for up to 3 weeks.” p. 148
Steam the sweet potato for 20 minutes or until soft. Remove from
the heat and mash.
Steam the salmon for 10–15 minutes until it flakes easily. Remove
from the heat and flake the salmon, discarding any bones.
Meanwhile, cook half the quinoa in a saucepan of boiling water
for 20 minutes or until soft. Rinse and drain well.
Place the sweet potato, salmon, cooked quinoa, almond meal,
egg, curry paste, beans, kaffi r lime leaves and lime zest and juice
in a bowl and mix well to combine.
Divide the mixture into four portions and form into patties.
Sprinkle both sides of the patties with the remaining quinoa
to lightly coat.
Melt the coconut oil in a large deep frying pan over medium heat
and cook the fi sh cakes (in batches if necessary) for 5 minutes
on each side or until golden and cooked through. Serve the fish
cakes on salad leaves with lime wedges, if you like.