Hero No Knead Crusty Loaf – Poh Bakes 100 Gretas – Poh Ling Yeow

Poh Bakes_CVR

Images and recipes from Poh Bakes 100 Greats by Poh Ling Yeow (Murdoch Books, RRP $39.99) Photography by Alan Benson

 

 

hero no-knead crusty loaf

 

‘Hero’ because it’s how you will feel when you haul this rustic beauty out of the oven. Every time I make this New York Times inspired recipe, I’m amazed at how technically undemanding this is. The main ingredient is time, but a cast-iron pot with a lid (a ceramic or glass ovenproof dish will also work) is also imperative. The resulting loaf feels somehow ancient and substantial. It has a serious crust, open crumb and a robust bite, with flavour that hints towards a sourdough. You will enjoy making and eating this over and over again.

 

No Knead Bread_pg15

Makes 1 LOAF

ingredients

450 g (1 lb/3 cups) plain  (all-purpose) flour + extra
for dusting

1/4 teaspoon instant dried yeast

11/4 teaspoons salt

380–400 ml (13–14 fl oz) water

Polenta (coarse cornmeal) or wheat bran, for dusting

 

method

Combine the flour, yeast and salt in a medium–large mixing bowl. Mix together the ingredients quickly with your hands, then make a well in the centre and pour in the water. Using a circular motion, bring the ingredients together to form a sticky, wet dough.

 

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap, and allow the dough to rest in a warm (if possible) and draught-free spot in the house for a minimum of 12 hours (but 18 is preferable), or until the surface of the dough is dotted with bubbles. (In winter, I’ve found this can be up to 20 hours.) If you tilt the bowl, the bubbles will give the dough a stringy appearance.

 

Flour your work surface well, scrape the dough onto it, sprinkle with a little more flour, then roughly flatten it with your hands. Give it an envelope fold: pull the front and back into the centre, then repeat with the sides. Sprinkle a generous amount of polenta (the size of a dinner plate) in the centre of a clean tea towel. Place the dough on it seam side up, and sprinkle more polenta on top, before loosely folding the sides of the tea towel to cover it completely. Allow the dough to rise for another 2–8 hours (depending on climate) until it doubles in size and does NOT spring back easily when prodded.

 

When you feel that the dough is close to being fully risen, preheat the oven to 210°C (410°F) fan-forced. Place a 25–28 cm (10–11 inch) cast-iron (or glass or ceramic) pot and its lid into the oven at the same time. When ready to bake, remove the pot from the oven—be very careful, as it will be ragingly hot. Uncover the dough, slide your hand under the tea towel and swiftly flip the dough into the pot.

 

Shimmy the dough a bit, so that it sits in the centre, then cover and bake for 30 minutes. Remove the lid and bake for a further 30 minutes or until beautifully brown. It should look on the flat side and make
a crisp, hollow sound as opposed to a dull thud if tapped. Cool for at least 20 minutes on a wire rack before eating. When you cut into it, the crust should be super crunchy, the air bubbles large and the texture a little chewy.

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Sisters in Crime 2017 Davitt Award Winners

WOW!!! I am over the moon that a few of my most enjoyable reads won awards – congratulations to all!

Cath Ferla was awarded the Davitt for best debut book for Ghost Girls (Bonnier Publishing Australia)

Ghost Girls

 

Megan Norris

Megan Norris won the Davitt for Non-Fiction for Look What You Made Me Do, Fathers Who Kill  (Bonnier Publishing Australia)

 

The Dry

The Dry (Pan Macmillan) by Melbourne author Jane Harper took out two awards at Sisters in Crime’s 17th Davitt Awards for best crime books by women on Saturday night (26 August) at Melbourne’s Thornbury Theatre. Her debut novel won Davitts for Best Adult Novel and Readers’ Choice, as judged by the 600 members of Sisters in Crime.

 

Check out the full list of winners here:  https://www.sistersincrime.org.au/jane-harpers-the-dry-double-winner-at-sisters-in-crimes-17th-davitt-awards-for-best-crime-books/

The Eisteddfod at the State Theatre Centre + WIN TICKETS

The Eisteddfod at the State Theatre Centre + WIN TICKETS

For those living in Perth and surrounds – your chance to win tickets to an award winning play

The Perth Project

When I was in high school, I dreamed of becoming an actor. I loved the spectacle of it, the ability to be another character, to step outside of my introvert self and explore the endless possibilities acting offered. I took drama classes at school and did OK – my teacher’s wouldn’t have said I was destined to be a star but I wasn’t terrible either. I even thought about going to WAAPA, but somewhere along the line I realised I liked the stories more than the acting and got into writing instead.

But there is something still so undeniably exciting about theatre, whether it’s a world class or an amateur production, it just ignites that sense of possibility within me. That’s why I am so excited to be running a competition to give away a double pass to see The Esiteddfod at the State Theatre Centre to share the magic of…

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Tomato, Fennel and Salmon Soup: All Day Cafe – Stuart McKenzie

All Day Cafe_CVR

‘Images and recipes from All Day Café by Stuart McKenzie (Murdoch Books). Photography by Armelle Habib. RRP $39.99.’

 

Tomato, fennel and salmon soup with saffron aioli

Serves 4–6

“Inspired by bouillabaisse, this is a hearty and comforting soup, heady with the aroma of saffron. Throw in some mussels and prawns (shrimp) and you have a delicious seafood stew.” p. 204

Bouquet garni

1 orange, zest removed in strips with a potato peeler

1 cinnamon stick

4 star anise

1 teaspoon fennel seeds

1 teaspoon coriander seeds

1 teaspoon black peppercorns

6 bay leaves

6 thyme sprigs

 

Soup

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 onion, sliced

1 fennel bulb, thinly sliced

2 garlic cloves, minced

1/4 teaspoon chilli flakes

250 ml (9 fl oz/1 cup) white wine

2 x 400 g (14 oz) tins diced tomatoes

1 litre (35 fl oz/4 cups) Chicken stock or Vegetable stock  (page 151)

300 g (10 1/2 oz) skinless salmon fillet, diced

a small pinch of saffron threads

 

Saffron aïoli

a pinch of saffron threads

1/2 quantity Aïoli (page 111)

 

Tomato fennel and salmon soup

 

To make the bouquet garni, tie all the ingredients together in a piece of muslin (cheesecloth).

 

To make the soup, heat the olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, fennel, garlic and chilli and sauté for about 7 minutes, or until the onion and fennel are translucent and starting to colour.

 

Add the wine, tomatoes, stock, salmon, saffron
and bouquet garni. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes. Season with sea salt and freshly ground pepper.

 

To make the saffron aioli, put the saffron in a small bowl with 1 tablespoon water and leave to soak for 15–20 minutes, to activate the stamen and release the colour. Drain, discarding the water. Add the saffron to the aïoli and mix well.

 

To serve, ladle the soup into bowls and top with a dollop of saffron aïoli.

 

 

Choc Orange and Almond Bliss Balls: Get Lean Stay Lean – Dr Joanna McMillan

This is a wonderfully healthy and tasty way to end a meal or as a snack to have with an afternoon cup of  tea or coffee.  So simple to make  – ingredients that can be found in most pantries; dates, almond meal, a fresh orange, cocoa powder …easy.
**A personal preference  – I rolled mine in coconut – the recipe states use extra almond meal.

 

oc-orange-and-almond-bliss-balls