Lemon Chicken with Golden Onions and Green Olives: The Good Carbs Cook Book -Dr Alan Barclay, Kate McGhie & Philippa Sandall

Good Carbs Cookbook

 

Images and recipes from The Good Carbs Cookbook by Dr. Alan Barclay, Kate McGhie & Philippa Sandall Murdoch Books RRP $$39.99 Photography by Alan Benson

 

Lemon Chicken with Golden Onions and Green Olives

“With a nod to an unctuous Moroccan tagine, the spice mix is mild and the turmeric produces a gorgeous golden colour in the onions when the chicken is cooked. Ground ginger withstands higher cooking temperatures than fresh ginger, without changing its flavour.” p.56

 

Lemon Chicken Cooked In A Spice Paste With-Golden Onions And Green Olives

PREPARATION TIME: 25 minutes | COOKING TIME: 1 hour | SERVES: 6

3 garlic cloves, crushed
1 teaspoon ground cumin
½ teaspoon ground chilli
2 teaspoons ground turmeric
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1 handful coriander (cilantro) leaves and stems, chopped, plus extra, finely chopped, to garnish
1 handful parsley, chopped
¼ cup (60 ml/2 fl oz) lemon juice
½ cup (125 ml/4 fl oz) olive oil
4 skinless bone-in chicken thighs
4 skinless bone-in chicken drumsticks
5 medium onions, thinly sliced
sea salt flakes
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1 lemon, thinly sliced
1 cup (250 ml/9 fl oz) water
1 cup (180 g/6½ oz) pitted green olives

 

Combine the garlic, cumin, chilli, turmeric, pepper, coriander, parsley, lemon juice and 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large bowl. Add the chicken and toss until evenly coated in the spice paste. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and marinate in the refrigerator for 4 hours.

Heat 2 tablespoons of the remaining oil in a large sturdy heatproof pan over medium–high heat. Working in batches, add the chicken pieces and fry for about 10 minutes, turning once until golden brown on both sides. Transfer the chicken to a plate and cover loosely with foil to keep warm.

Put the onions in the pan with the remaining oil and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions soften.

Return the chicken to the pan with the ginger, lemon and water. Bring to a lively simmer and then reduce the heat to medium–low and cook, covered, for about 40 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through. Test by piercing the meat near the bone with a fine skewer and if the juices run clear, the chicken is cooked.

Remove from the heat and scatter with the olives and extra coriander.

Lovely served with couscous or brown rice.

 

Sneak Peek: Delicious Every Day – Anna Gare

delicious-every-day

Delicious Every Day

Anna Gare

Murdoch Books

ISBN: 9781742663906

I received this inspiring book in the mail yesterday. The synopsis states :

Learn to cook delicious food every day with Anna Gare’s delicious new cookbook that is mostly healthy, always tasty.

One of Australia’s most popular television cooks, Anna Gare, knows a thing or two about balancing a busy life with the need to serve up delicious, healthy food for the whole family, every day. In Delicious Every Day, she shares her absolute favourite go-to recipes: food to feed a crowd and to keep you and the rest of the family ticking over. There are solutions to midweek dinner dramas, such as Japanese salmon with miso broccoli and brown rice, one-pot stars such as herby chicken casserole on pearl barley, and ideas for salads and easy sides that are so good they’ll steal the show. Then you decide whether to be naughty or nice when it comes to dessert: Mexican spiced chocolate torte vs banana chia and almond cake with honeyed labne? Including a chapter on full-flavour no-fuss ideas for party food, Delicious Every Day contains the family recipes you’ll come back to again and again.”

I agree- this is a keeper – a book to add to the kitchen library with many recipes that I will use again and again. (And a hint – this is the perfect house warming present for those new to cooking for themselves- the recipes are easy, scrumptious and there are ideas suitable for all occasions – salads to share, breakfasts, onepot meals, party tricks…).

Tonight I made (with the ingredients I had on hand) Chicken Provencale p.124  Seconds were required, it was so good – and the leftovers have already been allocated for husband’s lunch tomorrow !

Chicken Provencale

Science InThe Kitchen

In previous posts I have reviewed a couple of books on Gut Health- Gut  and Heal You Gut and provided a few Gut Friendly recipes for you to try.  This is what you will find in our kitchen/fridge and pantry these days (might need a bigger or extra fridge soon).  I am loving Kombucha Tea – but must make bigger quantities in future – it a great probiotic drink (recipe can be found in Heal Your Gut by Lee Holmes), my sour dough is well worth the effort of making, the fermented vegetables (husband makes these for us – and currently we are using red and green cabbages from the garden) is great with roasts or sausages, the olives are fermented, the fruit from our trees and taste great and the milk kefir I add to smoothies, husband drinks it by the glassful.

Kombucha Tea

Kombucha Tea – final product – Green tea and  black tea ferments

 

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L-R Fermented veg – green and red cabbage, sour dough starter, olives, milk kefir

 

Sour Dough

Sour Dough

 

Kombucha starter

Kombucha starter

The Fruits Of Our Labour

Some of you may recall that a few months ago we began the process of pickling/curing our olives. The olives have been sitting in a salt bath (a 10% salt solution) and the brine changed regularly over the past four weeks or so. Today we tasted a few olives from one of the buckets of fruit – the one that held the riper of the olives – and they were amazing – salty (as they should be at this stage) but tasty and no hint of bitter acid. The remaining buckets of fruit will need just a few more days of soaking then they too will be ready to finish processing.

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Once the bitterness has leached away the next step in the process is to rinse off the heavy salt water brine and prepare a new mix of water, salt and vinegar. The rinsed olives are loosely packed in a sterilised jar, the new salt/vinegar brine is poured over to cover the olives and a layer of olive oil seals the mix. The jars are then stored in a cupboard/pantry for about one month. At this point the flavours will have matured and the olives are ready to eat – just rinse off required amount (some say leave olives in plain water in the fridge for 24 hours to leach some of the salt away), then sprinkle with herbs/flavourings of your choice – chilli or red capsicum, garlic or lemon juice and  finish with a dash of olive oil and let marinade in fridge for a few hours before ready to eat. YUM!

 

The jars of olives in the vinegar/salt water brine will keep for about a year in the pantry. Hopefully they will last until next seasons fruit is harvested…but I am not sure about that, they are so delicious.

Green Is The Colour Of My Garden…

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This weekend we spent preparing olives for pickling; that entailed – picking from the tree, then cutting a cross on the ends (both ends) of the individual olives, then placing them in a brine bath which allows some of the bitter acids in the olive to leach away.  The olives are left for twenty four hours then they are rinsed and then the brine is replaced, this process is repeated for 2-4 weeks depending on the olive, a taste test is required. Then the olives have a final rinse and are placed in jars and filled with picking solution and left for a few months to develop their flavours and then enjoyed 🙂  This year despite the trees taking a heavy loss of fruit to the parrots we had plenty of olives to meet our needs.

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